Bone vs Tusq. If you were making a completely 50s-correct build then yes, go for bone, although even then, the off-white versions of TUSQ can be made to look like bone very easily. I did this with TUSQ vs. I'll get around to trying all of these at some point and will probably do an A/B/C test where I record it in a controlled setting. Tusq seems to somehow now bring out a lot more dynamics in my guitars than bone. Only a plastic nut is cheaper. I had a luthier install a Colosi bone saddle in my 814ce and have been pleased with the results. I'd go for TUSQ or TUSQ XL, every time. Tusq Nut vs Bone: Advantages and Disadvantages. It has ebony bridge pins with Martin SP PB strings. Re: Tusq vs bone « Reply #9 on: May 09, 2015, 08:59:01 AM » Late to this one, but my stance on the issue is the changes make a difference - for some people and on some guitars. So I thought either try TUSQ and or a bone replacement from StewMac. It's really hard to recommend bone these days. Also better intonation. Graphite vs plastic vs bone nuts: one of the best ways of improving your guitar’s tone is by changing its nut. Bone vs. Tusq I know this has probably been discussed before, but I am curious as to any insight concerning bone vs. tusq - not fosilized ivory, just cow bone. I recently swapped out a Tusq saddle for Bone on my Martin HD 28 copy and it seems more balanced now and not so shrill. Like any nut material, the bone and Tusq nuts have advantages and drawbacks. At least half of my guitars now have tusq saddles, including my main Gibson, my 2006 J-45 1964 CS, as O our back in the original tusq ADJ saddle after using a replacement bone ADJ saddle for a number of years. Out of curiosity I called Gibson and asked why a guitar that retailed originally for something like $1,600 didn't have a bone saddle. Some players want to stick to a bone nut, while others want to try this modern nut material. Which is brighter, Bone or Tusq? I had a Gibson L-130 for a while and got better sound when I had my luthier make a bone saddle for it. Bone on my Larrivee some months ago and proved that, for that guitar, the difference between TUSQ and bone was too small to reliably tell you which one I was listening to. ... Tusq. Tusq is a brand name of synthetic ivory that is rapidly growing in popularity due to its clean, bright tones.