Bluebonnets have been plentiful this season, but a picture of a snake that has gone viral, has bluebonnet enthusiasts on edge. That's where they wait for food,” he said. As indicated by the 1 April 2014 dating of the original article, the description of the Texas Bonnet Rattlesnake’s discovery is an April Fool’s Day prank, and the creature itself (along with the “Texas Identification and Taxonomy Association” organization and the fabricated local television news screen shots embedded in the article) is nothing more than a fictional creation devised in the perpetration of a joke. Wooten says avoid places like tall grass and shady spots. Example:     [Collected via Facebook, April 2014]. Some Texans wear cowboy boots to look stylish, but real Texans wear cowboy boots to prevent snake bites, particularly, when snakes go for the ankles. That's when it bit. It is safe to say, with certainty, that this rattlesnake has reached an evolutionary point where it is interacting with our Texas State Flower. He went to move some things around and disturbed the snake. Signs of Spring are everywhere across Texas, but none are as eagerly anticipated as the arrival of our beloved state flower, the Texas Bluebonnet!. Texas wildflowers are everywhere, and so are some dangers if you venture out in them. And on the Austin Reddit page, there's an equally frightening image of a snake lying in wait.. Dr. William Nye, founder of TITA and Professor of Biological Sciences at The University of Texas, released this statement after visiting Bend, Texas to inspect the snake over the weekend: But, hibernating critters, like rattlesnakes, are back out and about. A website presenting itself as an educational tool on the integrity of U.S. elections bases its extrapolations on debunked rumors and hoaxes. It's the time we're mostly likely to see them, and if we're lucky, avoid their bite. Posted at 6:13 PM, Apr 14, 2020 . "I had what was called a "non-envenomation." It is safe to say, with certainty, that this rattlesnake has reached an evolutionary point where it is interacting with our Texas State Flower. A viral photo showing a blue “Texas Bonnet Rattlesnake” is merely an April Fools’ Day joke. "Realize, you're never really alone, so be cautious of your surroundings," he said. Kidwell says he'd gone into a storage room at a home at Lake Whitney he'd listed to sell. Snopes and the Snopes.com logo are registered service marks of Snopes.com. Claim:   Photograph shows a newly-discovered snake species known as the Texas Bonnet Rattlesnake. The aftermath of every April 1 sees a few online jokes that linger and continue to fool and confuse readers well after that day has come and passed, and this item is proving to be one of them. The snake has obvious similarities to the Lupinis Texensis, or Bluebonnet. The transition periods between presidential administrations are known to be sensitive. and last updated 2020-04-14 19:18:43-04. This is the first Texas Bonnet Rattlesnake that we have documented but maybe that’s the whole point … this species has evolved so they will NOT be seen. Dr. William Nye, founder of TITA and Professor of Biological Sciences at The University of Texas, released this statement after visiting Bend, Texas to inspect the snake over the weekend: “This weekend, we had the opportunity to observe a previously unknown specimen in Bend, Texas. Boots didn't help him much, because a rattlesnake bit him on the hand. Whoever that person on the viral call may be, you should know Canadian medical organizations have released statements refuting his comments. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. A repeated election fraud claim by Trump about the number of mail-in ballots in Pennsylvania bears no relationship to reality. One can certainly find plenty of rattlesnakes and bluebonnets in Texas, sometimes in the same place, but for now neither species has started resembling the other. San Antonio's KSAT-TV recently fielded a report on a viral image of a snake among a field of bluebonnets. "I know first hand that this is the season, and we are in the great state that has snakes, and I've got the scar to prove it," he said. The Governing Committee at TITA has designated the snake’s scientific name as ‘Crotalus Lupinus,’ and the discoverer, Robert McCrae, has assigned the common name of ‘Texas Bonnet Rattlesnake.’ While a lot of research is still needed, this find reestablishes everything we teach about natural selection and adaptation. A stunning photograph had some wondering whether it was real. Evolution is Nature’s smartest tool and I remain hopeful that future data reveals a thriving new species.”. By: Sydney Isenberg. This is the first Texas Bonnet Rattlesnake that we have documented but maybe that’s the whole point … this species has evolved so they will NOT be seen. Watch where you walk. “This weekend, we had the opportunity to observe a previously unknown specimen in Bend, Texas. Bluebonnet season also means snake season in Texas. Spring time is here! several images and a description of the animal: Crotalus Lupinus (Texas Bonnet Rattlesnake). Both images are questionable: an expert tells KSAT-TV that the snake is probably a dead, taxidermied animal. Springtime brings out the snakes in Texas, and nobody knows that better than Dallas Realtor Russ Kidwell. A routine review of content labeled satire. The photograph that supposedly shows a newly discovered species in Texas Hill Country, the Bluebonnet Rattle Snake, has been circulating widely on Facebook and other social networking sites. ... After all, Texas is home to 113 species of snakes. Right-wing activists and commentators, including President Trump's sons and lawyers, targeted an elections technology employee in November 2020. The snake has obvious similarities to the Lupinis Texensis, or Bluebonnet. Don't forget those storage buildings. That's where snakes hide. This one has been chaos. What makes spring the most dangerous time? The snake has obvious similarities to the Lupinis Texensis, or Bluebonnet. Moose should also avoiding licking vans, trucks, or people. There were also warnings that this newly evolved creature is dangerous, and that people should be careful while playing in the Bluebonnets (plants). ”As everything starts to warm back up and get wet again, everything's gonna start moving around, and snakes are gonna need to feed more,” he explained. If you see a snake, don’t bother it, and don’t forget your cowboy boots for ankle protection. Russ Kidwell sure won't. Bluebonnet Photography Tips. The Governing Committee at TITA has designated the snake’s scientific name as ‘Crotalus Lupinus,’ and the discoverer, Robert McCrae, has assigned the common name of ‘Texas Bonnet Rattlesnake.’ While a lot of research is still needed, this find reestablishes everything we teach about natural selection and adaptation. The Governing Committee at TITA has designated the snake’s scientific name as ‘Crotalus Lupinus,’ and the discoverer, Robert McCrae, has assigned the common name of ‘Texas Bluebonnet Rattlesnake.’ “While a lot of research is still needed, this find reestablishes everything we … several images and a description of the animal: Crotalus Lupinus (Texas Bonnet Rattlesnake). Evolution is Nature’s smartest tool and I remain hopeful that future data reveals a thriving new species.”. Jeff Wooten of Cen-Tex Pest Control calls it nature's annual awakening. Origins:   1 April 2014 saw the online publishing of an article about the putative discovery of new species of snake known as the Texas Bonnet Rattlesnake, a serpent that had supposedly evolved to sport a blue coloration which allowed it to blend in unnoticed amidst fields of the ubiquitous Texas state flower, the bluebonnet: On Saturday morning, the Texas Identification and Taxonomy Association tweeted that several members were en route to Bend, Texas after local game wardens were unable to identify an “unusual organism.” On Monday morning, TITA confirmed that the animal was “a previously unknown species of snake” and released Which means flowers are blooming and it's the perfect time to take those famous Texas Bluebonnet pictures. This material may not be reproduced without permission. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.