All the vegetables and herbs are great sources of vitamins and minerals, so that's a huge advantage." "The best and healthiest chicken soup is usually the one you make yourself. Chicken noodle soup can be made with a variety of ingredients but the healthiest pots will have lots of vegetables and include whole grains. On the other hand, fast-food versions packed in sodium and saturated fat may not be the best choice for a daily meal. Try to pick one that's lower in sodium and with a simple ingredient list (I'm partial to Pacific Foods' Organic Free Range Chicken Broth). Include carrots, celery, onions and handfuls of spinach or baby kale and plenty of fresh or dried herbs, like parsley and basil (and sometimes a dollop of pesto at the end). In one 1978 research study in the journal Chest, 15 research subjects were provided with either cold water, hot water or hot chicken soup. And with that brings up the talk of boosting immunity through our lifestyle—foods, exercise and sleep—as a start to offer at least some layer of protection, so you show up ready to battle anything that comes your way. Soup makes up a part of many weight-loss diets for a reason -- it tends to be low in energy density. Compare labels for sodium content and read ingredient lists to find an option that feels close to homemade. Chicken soup. In fact, chicken soup has been "prescribed" for the common cold for centuries. Growing up, my mom always served her chicken soup soup over orzo. Everything you need for a delicious feast. That means the hot chicken soup can help clear your airways and easing congestion. The best store-bought broth will be just like you would make at home but without the mess and still rich and full of flavor so it can be used as a base for your favorite chicken (or any) soup. The real question starts with, "How it is made," says John Whyte, M.D., M.P.H., Chief Medical Officer at WebMD. And certainly better than most canned soup options available on most grocery store shelves, which can be loaded with sodium but very little in the way of added vegetables (or flavor, for that matter). We now opt for other, more fiber forward grains that are also rich in plenty of vitamins and minerals to add to the nutrition (and give a flavor boost to boot). Plus, you likely won't find whole grains or a whole lot of chicken in the options you can buy. (Try more of these 8 foods to soothe a sore throat.). The real question starts with, "How it is made," says John Whyte, M.D., M.P.H., Chief Medical Officer at WebMD. After eating a rotisserie chicken, toss the carcass in a pot with some carrots, celery, onion, garlic and herbs—add some salt and fill the pot with water. We love using hearty, nutty farro in place of noodles, like Bob's Red Mill Farro, which offers 5 grams of fiber and 5 grams of protein per serving, making it a nutritional gem that helps fill us up as well. Once you've figured out your broth, it's time to up the veggies. There have been a few more studies that are more recent that support that theory as well; one in 2000 in the same journal, Chest, suggested a mild anti-inflammatory benefit of chicken soup, which could also come from adding in plenty of quality ingredients that can certainly boost the nutritive value as well. The chicken soup diet is a seven-day diet plan for weight loss. has a DIY-broth trick that starts with rotisserie chicken. Compare labels for sodium content and read ingredient lists to find an option that feels close to homemade. Make your chicken soup with garlic and lots of veggies—especially dark, leafy greens—to boost up the inflammation-fighting compounds. In addition to the vegetables themselves though, there's actually some research to support the benefits of a little chicken soup. Chicken noodle soup can be made with a variety of ingredients but the healthiest pots will have lots of vegetables and include whole grains. We love using hearty, nutty farro in place of noodles, like Bob's Red Mill Farro, which offers 5 grams of fiber and 5 grams of protein per serving, making it a nutritional gem that helps fill us up as well. (Our Classic Chicken Soup recipe, pictured above, fits the bill.). Strain and store in the fridge for up to 1 week or freeze for up to 3 months." With the changing seasons and cooler temps also comes a higher likelihood and risk of colds and flu. Consuming chicken noodle soup apparently will boost your daily intake of protein and micro nutrients such as vitamin A and selenium. Finally, think about what you top and serve your soup with. Strain and store in the fridge for up to 1 week or freeze for up to 3 months." But was grandma right—is it actually good for you? In addition to the vegetables themselves though, there's actually some research to support the benefits of a little chicken soup. this link is to an external site that may or may not meet accessibility guidelines. This soup contains a variety of important minerals such as sodium and potassium. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer (uncovered) for about 2 to 3 hours. (Our Classic Chicken Soup recipe, pictured above, fits the bill.). If you're short on time, buying a quality broth and adding noodles, pre-cooked chicken and a few vegetables is a nice shortcut. EatingWell may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. These minerals keep your electrolytes in balance. The one time you may want to hold off on too many veggies and not use whole grains is if you need something easy to digest—like after a stomach bug or GI symptoms (learn more about easy-to-digest foods here).